Israel Lebanon war protest

 on 

Today, 31st of July at Martin place there was an anti-war protest organised by the Lebanese community.

The crowd was chanting strong anti-Israeli and anti-American slogans, with the most memorable being “Israel, USA how many children you’ve killed today?”. Another chant went like this: “What are we fighting for? To stop the war”
Despite highly charged atmosphere the crowd was well organised and well behaved. The riot police present near by in numbers had no need to intervene.

Here are some photographs from the event.

Many people were holding posters with sign “Stop Israeli Terrorism

Some of the protesters were holding up photos showing burning bodies.

Both Australian and Lebanese flags were waved by the crowd.

Disappointment with United Nations inability to stop the war and killings of civilians was also manifested.

Many of the women were visibly overcome with emotions.

Please note this is a photographis account of events and the author does not endorse or condone the event or its nature and content.

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  • billy Bob

    Well I think that if I could meet with the young lady center of the first photo that the two us us could reach an accord. Yes I feel that we could really come to a compromise. If nothing else I feel that we could come to a special peace…. LOL photos are great and teh UN one Rocks.

  • Awais Yaqub

    Great piece of Pj you captured it well i loved prayer photo actually it depends on “Kaba” muslims pray toward direction of Kaba i dont know what was direction at that place
    salam

  • Allen M.

    I must disagree with Mr. Sulonen. The way I see it, I have no doubt Ted has an opinion, but is not expressing it with the posts of these photos here (which I agree with—this is not the place). I for one have been thinking of shooting a local protest. They are pretty common here in Los Angeles. But…I would not wade into the protesters with a wide-angle lens unless I had a press pass. If things got out of hand, un-credentialed photographers have no protection from the authorities. And it’s not the protesters I would be worrying about.
    Great shots Ted.

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  • wxwax

    I really like the second shot, Ted. It tells a powerful story. Pity some folks can’t keep their politics out of this thread and just comment on the photos.

    Nice job, expecially for a spur-of-the-moment shoot of a kind that you’ve never done before!

  • I have not posted a side of any issue. I have reported on an event I witnessed while walking the streets of Sydney.

    I am not sure how M Gibson’s alleged actions relate to this story!? I doubt he knew the event even took place.

  • Ken M

    i think this is a sensitive issue. on both sides. there is reporting that says some of the photos in lebanon were staged for photographers. see here:
    http://eureferendum.blogspot.com/2006/07/milking-it.html
    also, the fact that mel gibson swore he did not hate jews and then spewed anti-jewish nonsense after having a drink and getting arrested for drunk driving (and having the original report covered up by the police) makes some people wary of your goals in posting one side of the issue.

  • Bill Walsh

    One sided photos that prove nothing but to inflame people.

  • This is a news item about a protest that took place in Sydney, Australia. It is not an editorial commentary on events in the middle east.

    Should I come across the rally organised by the other side they will get equal coverage. Simple as that.

    For people who suggested use of wide angle lens and getting much closer – I’ll try that. This is first ever protest I’ve ever took photos of and it is actually quite difficult to capture.

    Just for the record: I take my camera and go for walks around Sydney during lunch time. I take photos of people.

  • So rockets originating in Lebanon and landing in Northern Isreal having nothing to do with this?
    Had these people taken these wooden signs and bonked Hizbollah on the head to begin with none of this would have happened and no one would have been hurt.

    I agree with Petterri’s comments.

  • Mike Haner

    Great shots Ted. I disagree with Petteri and his remark was very out of line. Some folks are always looking for a fight and have little talent for C&C. I thought the shots did much to capture the feeling of the event. The one wiht the lady holding up the pictures really illustrates her emotion IMO. Great shots of the event.

  • punnie

    You can’t be neutral in war. Either you are for it or against it. Claiming to be only taking nice pictures is a cop out. The real shame is not taking advantage of being able to express your opinions.

  • Dom

    I think the tight tele framings can give just as much an impression of closeness as well as distance. We can see the facial expressions better with a tele, though I agree a few wideangle shots would give more of a feeling of viewer involvement with the scene, and add some variety.

    I disagree with Petteri re. the opinions disclaimer, for reasons here
    http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1019&message=19407538

  • SteveH

    Nice shots, Ted – you’ve captured a range of emotions and they are interesting shots to look at. I’d have to agree with Petteri though about the sole use of a telephoto – IMO the selective use of a WA and “getting in there” adds a lot of interest. As an example I tried to cover a similar event in Adelaide last year – there are a few shots at http://www.steveh.smugmug.com/gallery/973613

  • Mandi Humphrey

    Petteri, I know Ted from a forum where he posts his photos. How arrogant of you to say he is “cowardly…like you don’t have an opinion on the issues at hand.” He is photograpging what he sees and trying to be objective. He certainly does not need me to defend him. I just could not let this comment go un-answered. You are completely unfair to make that statment to him. Shame on you!

  • Roddy

    Good work! Isn’t it a shame that, in a country that stands for freedom, (and, I contend, became that through free dessimation of the news) that we are almost afraid to show the news for fear of retaliation! We MUST stand against this implied censorship! Newsmen tell us what is happening-we decide in our hearts and minds whether it is good or bad!
    Hang in there,
    Rod

  • The photos are OK, although the use of telephoto and tight framings give an impression of distance (both emotional and physical), like you’re hiding behind your lens. However, IMO it’s cowardly to put in that disclaimer and make like you don’t have an opinion on the issues at hand.

  • Nir

    excellent shots ted! really caught the feel and mood!

    nir
    jerusalem, israel

  • Pingback: Digital Photo Gallery of Ted Szukalski : Blog Archive : Prayer()

  • billy Bob

    Well I think that if I could meet with the young lady center of the first photo that the two us us could reach an accord. Yes I feel that we could really come to a compromise. If nothing else I feel that we could come to a special peace…. LOL photos are great and teh UN one Rocks.

  • Awais Yaqub

    Great piece of Pj you captured it well i loved prayer photo actually it depends on “Kaba” muslims pray toward direction of Kaba i dont know what was direction at that place
    salam

  • Allen M.

    I must disagree with Mr. Sulonen. The way I see it, I have no doubt Ted has an opinion, but is not expressing it with the posts of these photos here (which I agree with—this is not the place). I for one have been thinking of shooting a local protest. They are pretty common here in Los Angeles. But…I would not wade into the protesters with a wide-angle lens unless I had a press pass. If things got out of hand, un-credentialed photographers have no protection from the authorities. And it’s not the protesters I would be worrying about.
    Great shots Ted.

  • Pingback: Digital Photo Gallery of Ted Szukalski : Blog Archive : Prayer()

  • wxwax

    I really like the second shot, Ted. It tells a powerful story. Pity some folks can’t keep their politics out of this thread and just comment on the photos.

    Nice job, expecially for a spur-of-the-moment shoot of a kind that you’ve never done before!

  • I have not posted a side of any issue. I have reported on an event I witnessed while walking the streets of Sydney.

    I am not sure how M Gibson’s alleged actions relate to this story!? I doubt he knew the event even took place.

  • Ken M

    i think this is a sensitive issue. on both sides. there is reporting that says some of the photos in lebanon were staged for photographers. see here:
    http://eureferendum.blogspot.com/2006/07/milking-it.html
    also, the fact that mel gibson swore he did not hate jews and then spewed anti-jewish nonsense after having a drink and getting arrested for drunk driving (and having the original report covered up by the police) makes some people wary of your goals in posting one side of the issue.

  • Bill Walsh

    One sided photos that prove nothing but to inflame people.

  • This is a news item about a protest that took place in Sydney, Australia. It is not an editorial commentary on events in the middle east.

    Should I come across the rally organised by the other side they will get equal coverage. Simple as that.

    For people who suggested use of wide angle lens and getting much closer – I’ll try that. This is first ever protest I’ve ever took photos of and it is actually quite difficult to capture.

    Just for the record: I take my camera and go for walks around Sydney during lunch time. I take photos of people.

  • So rockets originating in Lebanon and landing in Northern Isreal having nothing to do with this?
    Had these people taken these wooden signs and bonked Hizbollah on the head to begin with none of this would have happened and no one would have been hurt.

    I agree with Petterri’s comments.

  • Mike Haner

    Great shots Ted. I disagree with Petteri and his remark was very out of line. Some folks are always looking for a fight and have little talent for C&C. I thought the shots did much to capture the feeling of the event. The one wiht the lady holding up the pictures really illustrates her emotion IMO. Great shots of the event.

  • punnie

    You can’t be neutral in war. Either you are for it or against it. Claiming to be only taking nice pictures is a cop out. The real shame is not taking advantage of being able to express your opinions.

  • Dom

    I think the tight tele framings can give just as much an impression of closeness as well as distance. We can see the facial expressions better with a tele, though I agree a few wideangle shots would give more of a feeling of viewer involvement with the scene, and add some variety.

    I disagree with Petteri re. the opinions disclaimer, for reasons here
    http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1019&message=19407538

  • SteveH

    Nice shots, Ted – you’ve captured a range of emotions and they are interesting shots to look at. I’d have to agree with Petteri though about the sole use of a telephoto – IMO the selective use of a WA and “getting in there” adds a lot of interest. As an example I tried to cover a similar event in Adelaide last year – there are a few shots at http://www.steveh.smugmug.com/gallery/973613

  • Mandi Humphrey

    Petteri, I know Ted from a forum where he posts his photos. How arrogant of you to say he is “cowardly…like you don’t have an opinion on the issues at hand.” He is photograpging what he sees and trying to be objective. He certainly does not need me to defend him. I just could not let this comment go un-answered. You are completely unfair to make that statment to him. Shame on you!

  • Roddy

    Good work! Isn’t it a shame that, in a country that stands for freedom, (and, I contend, became that through free dessimation of the news) that we are almost afraid to show the news for fear of retaliation! We MUST stand against this implied censorship! Newsmen tell us what is happening-we decide in our hearts and minds whether it is good or bad!
    Hang in there,
    Rod

  • The photos are OK, although the use of telephoto and tight framings give an impression of distance (both emotional and physical), like you’re hiding behind your lens. However, IMO it’s cowardly to put in that disclaimer and make like you don’t have an opinion on the issues at hand.

  • Nir

    excellent shots ted! really caught the feel and mood!

    nir
    jerusalem, israel